The Drinking of Politics: If you can’t drink heavily, at least drink lightly.


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The Drinking of Politics: If you can’t drink heavily, at least drink lightly.

Mixing Social Drinking with Political Differences

If you must spend time with a family full of bigots, idiots and MAGA’s and if you can’t drink heavily, at least drink lightly—you may just save a life, namely, your own.

There are, of course, dangers in mixing even social drinking with political differences.

If you're like me, you enjoy having a drink or two or ten, especially during the holidays. But what happens when you have different political views from the people you're drinking with? Is it possible to have a civil and respectful conversation, or are you risking a heated argument that could ruin your relationship?

Here are some of the major dangers of mixing social drinking with political differences, and some tips on how to avoid them.

Danger #1: Alcohol lowers your inhibitions and impairs your judgment.

One of the most obvious effects of alcohol is that it lowers your inhibitions and impairs your judgment. This means that you're more likely to say things that you wouldn't normally say, or that you might regret later. You might also be less aware of how your words and actions affect others, or how they might perceive you.

This can be a problem when you're talking about politics, because politics can be a very sensitive and personal topic for many people. You might end up offending someone, or hurting their feelings, without even realizing it. You might also come across as rude, aggressive, or arrogant, which can damage your reputation and credibility.

Tip: If you're going to drink and talk politics, limit your alcohol intake, and stay within your limits. Know how much you can handle, and don't go overboard. Drink water or non-alcoholic beverages in between alcoholic drinks and eat some food to slow down the absorption of alcohol. If you feel yourself getting tipsy or losing control, stop drinking and switch to something else.

Danger #2: Alcohol makes you more emotional and less rational.

Another effect of alcohol is that it makes you more emotional and less rational. This means that you're more likely to react emotionally to what others say, rather than logically. You might also be less open-minded and more defensive, which can make it harder to listen and understand where others are coming from. This can be a problem when you're talking about politics because politics can be a very complex and nuanced topic that requires critical thinking and analysis. You might end up making sweeping generalizations, jumping to conclusions, or ignoring facts and evidence that contradict your views. You might also get angry, frustrated, or offended by what others say, which can escalate the situation and lead to conflict.

Tip: If you're going to drink and talk about politics, try to keep calm and rational. Don't let your emotions get the best of you, and don't take things personally. Remember that everyone has their own opinions and perspectives, and that they're not necessarily right or wrong. Try to be respectful and curious, rather than judgmental and dismissive. Ask questions, listen actively, and acknowledge points of agreement and disagreement.

Danger #3: Alcohol makes you more confident and less cautious.

A third effect of alcohol is that it makes you more confident and less cautious. This means that you're more likely to express your opinions and views without hesitation or fear of consequences. You might also be more willing to challenge or confront others who disagree with you, or to defend yourself if someone challenges or confronts you.

This can be a problem when you're talking about politics because politics can be a very controversial and divisive topic that can trigger strong reactions from others. You might end up saying something that is inappropriate, offensive, or even illegal, depending on the context and the laws of your country. You might also get into a heated argument or a physical fight with someone who opposes you, which can have serious consequences for your safety and well-being. But remember why you drink in the first place.

Five major reasons why people enjoy drinking alcohol.

Drinking alcohol is a common social activity that many people enjoy. But what are the reasons behind this enjoyment? 

Alcohol lowers inhibitions and boosts confidence. Many people feel more relaxed, outgoing and adventurous when they drink alcohol. They may also feel more comfortable expressing their emotions, opinions and desires. Alcohol can help people overcome shyness, anxiety and self-consciousness in social situations.

Alcohol enhances pleasure and reward. Alcohol stimulates the release of dopamine, a neurotransmitter that is involved in the brain's reward system. Dopamine makes us feel good, happy and motivated. Alcohol can also increase the sensitivity of the brain's pleasure receptors, making us more responsive to positive stimuli such as music, food and sex.

Alcohol reduces stress and negative emotions. Alcohol acts as a depressant, meaning it slows down the activity of the central nervous system. This can have a calming effect on the body and mind, reducing tension, anger, sadness and fear. Alcohol can also help people cope with difficult or traumatic experiences by numbing their pain and distress.

Alcohol creates a sense of belonging and connection. Drinking alcohol is often a way of bonding with others who share the same interests, values and goals. Alcohol can facilitate communication, cooperation and empathy among group members. Alcohol can also create a sense of identity and culture, as different drinks are associated with different traditions, rituals and occasions.

Alcohol offers variety and novelty. Drinking alcohol can be a way of exploring new tastes, sensations and experiences. There are many different types of alcoholic beverages to choose from, each with its own flavor, aroma and effect. Drinking alcohol can also expose people to new places, people and activities that they might not otherwise encounter.

Tip: If you're going to drink and talk about politics, be careful and mindful of what you say and how you say it. Don't say anything that you wouldn't say sober, or that could get you in trouble. Avoid topics that are too sensitive or controversial for the occasion or the audience. If someone disagrees with you or challenges you, don't take it as a personal attack or an invitation to fight unless you’re absolutely sure that you can kick their asses, agree to disagree, change the subject, or walk away if necessary.

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